Using the Jules Language System

The Jules Language System, commonly abbreviated "JLS" (pronounced "Jules"), is a highly reputable writing format developed by Jules Ismail at Northern Virginia Community College. It has been compared to the MLA and APA writing formats. All articles on jailypedia are expected to be JLS-compliant.

How to use JLS

Line Spacing, Font, Color, Margins

Whatever looks prettiest to you. Maybe something that's semi-relevant to what you're trying to accomplish.

Headers

If your writing is destined to be published in a hard-copy format like a book, or if it is an academic paper, or as a PDF emulating a hard-copy format, or you feel like being pretentious, each page should have, left-justified, the title of your work, the name you wish to use for attribution, and the page number in the following format:

TITLE | YOUR NAME | 106

The header can be in caps, lower case, or however else you feel about it.

Speling

Kinda important, but 'slong as your audience can figure out what you're saying 'sokay. Grammar 2.

Citations and Bibliography

Citations are extremely important as they help a reader verify your sources.

Internal Citations

Internal citations should be made within your writing whenever they are quoted, or the preceding sentence/multi-sentence idea is a derivative of a source. The format is represented merely by a number within brackets preceding the period ending the idea; for example[1]. If later on within your writing, you make another, separate, important statement using the same source, cite it with the same number you used previously[1].

Tip: Your citation numbers are representative of the order in which you used them within your writing!

The only exceptions are for citations of any work, quote, etc. by Avril Lavigne or Jules Ismail (see below). If you're editing or writing a jailypedia article, our hosts at wikidot have made using this system even easier, as you will read about later on in this article.

Bibliography

Your bibliography should follow your writing as a separate page (or multiple separate pages as the case may be) unless it is for an online article, in which case it should be the pinultimate heading in your article, the last being footnotes. Sources should be organized, and numbered, by the order in which they first appear within your writing.

There are different ways to cite different kinds of sources. Here is an example bibliography demonstrating a few:

Biblography
1: Title of First Book Source/Magazine/Newspaper (edition, other notes, if relevant) | Author | PG: 40 - 47 |

2: Title of Web Article (edition, other notes, if relevant) | Encompassing Designation of Web Source | Author, if available | Publish Date (optional/if available): YYYYMM.DD | Access Date: YYYYMM.DD | http://FULL.URL.HERE

3: Title of online streaming video (edition, other notes, if relevant) | Encompassing Series Title If Relevant | Username of Poster | Publish Date (optional/if available): YYYYMM.DD | Access Date: YYYYMM.DD | http://FULL.URL.HERE | TF: 00:00:00

4: Title of Movie/Show Episode (non-streaming) (edition, other notes, if relevant) | Encompassing Series Title If Relevant | Distributing Company Name | TF: 00:00:00

5: Avril Lavigne | If a quote, where and when that quote was spoken / If song, title of song / If Album, title of Album / If other: What and Where?

6: Jules. | Same as Avril Lavigne.

7: Name of Speaker | Title of Lecture/Speech | Date Spoken: YYYYMM.DD | Where Spoken: Locationsville, State, Country, Planet, etc.

8: Name of Sign or Plaque or First Line of Sign or Plaque | Latitude/Longitude

If there is no clarification for the type of source you want to cite above, make it up until it's added or email Jules about it.

| Key: PG - Pages | TF - TimeFrame |

Tip: Don't forget the period after "Jules" when citing a work of Jules Ismail.

Source Type #1: Printed, Published Works

Printed, Published Works are sources and references that have been physically produced on some kind of material medium and then released in mass quantities to the public. This source type is becoming more difficult to find, but is the easiest to verify

Source Type #2: Online Works

Online Works Are sources and references that have been placed on the internet for all with a web-enabled computer to see. These are arguably the easiest sources to find but the most difficult sources to verify.

Source Type #3: Streaming Video

Streaming Video is a video source that has been uploaded to the internet and can be played on a computer without having to download the entire file. This source type is easy to quote but may prove challenging for any other purpose.

Source Type #4: Movies/Television Shows (non-streaming)

Movies and Television Shows (non-streaming) are a video source that have aired on television, played in a theatre, or are available on some kind of physical media storage device (such as a VHS Tape, a DVD, or a Blu-Ray disc). These are sometimes difficult to find as permanent sources, making them very difficult to verify.

Source Type #5: Avril Lavigne

Avril Lavigne is a Canadian singer-songwriter, fashion designer, and occasional actress, not technically an actual source type, but Jules put her in here, so I'm going to humor her. Quotes from this source will be almost instantly accepted by Jules, but anyone else might take a second look (unless they worship Avril to the extent that Jules does), so be mindful about your audience when using this source type.

Source Type #6: Jules Ismail

Jules Ismail is a transgender actress, comedian, director, author, and spontaneous topless dancer, again not technically an actual source type, but Jules put herself in here, so I'm going to humor her yet again. Quotes from this source will be almost instantly accepted by Jules, but anyone else might take a second look (unless they worship Jules to the extent that Jules herself does), so be twice as mindful about your audience when using this source type.

Source Type #7: Lectures

Lectures are verbal speeches given by those with a greater level of knowledge and understanding (or at least those who think they have one) to those with a lower level of knowledge and understanding (at least in respect to the subject matter of the lecture). These are usually very difficult to verify unless there is a word-for-word transcript or a visual or auditory recording of the lecture. Once again, use with caution.

Source Type #8: Geocached Objects

Geocached Objects are objects that have not necessarily been mass-produced, but can be found by locating their exact latitude and longitude and either travelling to their location or viewing them through Google Maps' Street View feature. While this adds a challenge to the verification process, it does not make it any less reliable of a source.

A Note About Citing Avril Lavigne and Jules Ismail

Avril Lavigne does not need to conform to the system. That's what makes her so awesome. When internally citing Avril, you may forego the bracketed number and replace it with [AVRIL] in caps. Or you could include both. See the above example of a bibliography to see how that's handled.

As for Jules… Well, she IS Jules.

Footnotes

Footnotes are used for clarification purposes1. If you want to use a footnote, write a number as a superscript within your writing where you expect the reader to check the footnotes section for further information.

JLS and jailypedia

Our host, wikidot, makes it really easy to format with JLS while writing and editing articles here. Start off by creating a bibliography (clicking the "bib" button) and placing it at the end of your article. When you're writing and you want to cite something, cite it immediately.

Wikidot has a special format for generating bibliographies. You use a keyword to assist with your annotations. For example, your source citation might look like this:

: YourKeyWord : //Italics Article Name// | jailypedia | Access Date: 201002.04 | http://jaily.wikidot.com/jules-language-system

And then jump back to where you were in your article, and use the keyword at the end of the sentence to cite it[2].

And then jump back to where you were in your article, and use the keyword at the end of the sentence to cite it[((bibcite YourKeyWord))].

Take a look at the source for this page (link in the top right corner) if you need a better idea of how your JLS-formatted article should look on jailypedia (or any other wikidot site for that matter).

Support JLS!

If you use the JLS format on your website or online article please feel free to add a JLS%20Button.png image to your page! It is important to spread the word of reputable writing formats and devote ourselves to imposing them upon other people! Here's the code!

<a href = "http://jaily.wikidot.com/jules-language-system"><img src = http://sites.google.com/site/julesismail/home/JLS%20Button.png border=0></a>

If your work is hard copy, you may also copy and paste the image into your document, or use it on an exterior cover of your book. It doesn't matter where you put it; it is recommended that you also include driving directions to http://www.theroachyjay.tk or to this article to encourage your readers to learn about JLS!

Bibliography
1. Using the Jules Language System | jailypedia | Access Date: 201002.04 | http://jaily.wikidot.com/jules-language-system
2. Italics Article Name | jailypedia | Access Date: 201002.04 | http://jaily.wikidot.com/jules-language-system
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